Jim Corbett National Park

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Email: booking@jimcorbettnationalpark.in

About Us

Jim Corbett National Park, with its stunning wildlife and landscapes, has long captured the imaginations of many. In 1936, the natural uniqueness of the area was recognized and Corbett became the first national park established in mainland Asia. Covering 521 square kilometers in the hill state of Uttarakhand in northern India, Jim Corbett National Park lies in two districts – Nainital and Pauri. Together with the neighboring Sonanadi Wildlife Sanctuary and Reserve Forest areas, it forms the Corbett Tiger Reserve spanning 1288 square kilometers.

Jim Corbett National Park is a remarkable place for its variety of landscapes. Nestled between the Himalayas and the Tarai, the park is crisscrossed by streams, rivers, and ridges, presenting a vivid mosaic of habitats. These include wet and dry areas, plains and mountains, gentle and rugged terrain, and forests and grasslands. This variety supports numerous plant and animal species, representing both Himalayan and plains kinds. The most famous residents are the Bengal Tiger and the Asiatic Elephant, but with about 600 species of avifauna, Corbett is also one of the richest bird regions in India.

Jim Corbett National Park is a beautiful wildlife sanctuary that covers an area of 520.82 km (201.1 sq mi). The park is home to hills, riverine belts, marshy depressions, grasslands, and a large lake. The elevation of the park ranges from 1,300 to 4,000 ft (400 to 1,220 m). The nights in the winter can be cold but the days are usually bright and sunny. It rains from July to September in the park. Dense moist deciduous forests mainly consist of sal, haldu, peepal, rohini, and mango trees. The forest covers almost 73% of the park while 10% of the area consists of grasslands. This wildlife sanctuary is also home to around 110 tree species, 50 species of mammals, 580 bird species, and 25 reptile species. The historic forest rest houses of Jim Corbett National Park include Garjiya, Sultan, Gairal, Sarpdhuli, Khinanauli, Dhikala, Bijrani, Jhirna, Dhela, and Phato.

Jim Corbett National Park

Jim Corbett National Park, with its stunning wildlife and landscapes, has long captured the imaginations of many. In 1936, the natural uniqueness of the area was recognized and Corbett became the first national park established in mainland Asia. Covering 521 square kilometers in the hill state of Uttarakhand in northern India, Jim Corbett National Park lies in two districts – Nainital and Pauri. Together with the neighboring Sonanadi Wildlife Sanctuary and Reserve Forest areas, it forms the Corbett Tiger Reserve spanning 1288 square kilometers.

Jim Corbett National Park is a remarkable place for its variety of landscapes. Nestled between the Himalayas and the Tarai, the park is crisscrossed by streams, rivers, and ridges, presenting a vivid mosaic of habitats. These include wet and dry areas, plains and mountains, gentle and rugged terrain, and forests and grasslands. This variety supports numerous plant and animal species, representing both Himalayan and plains kinds. The most famous residents are the Bengal Tiger and the Asiatic Elephant, but with about 600 species of avifauna, Corbett is also one of the richest bird regions in India.

Jim Corbett National Park is a beautiful wildlife sanctuary that covers an area of 520.82 km (201.1 sq mi). The park is home to hills, riverine belts, marshy depressions, grasslands, and a large lake. The elevation of the park ranges from 1,300 to 4,000 ft (400 to 1,220 m). The nights in the winter can be cold but the days are usually bright and sunny. It rains from July to September in the park. Dense moist deciduous forests mainly consist of sal, haldu, peepal, rohini, and mango trees. The forest covers almost 73% of the park while 10% of the area consists of grasslands. This wildlife sanctuary is also home to around 110 tree species, 50 species of mammals, 580 bird species, and 25 reptile species. The historic forest rest houses of Jim Corbett National Park include Garjiya, Sultan, Gairal, Sarpdhuli, Khinanauli, Dhikala, Bijrani, Jhirna, Dhela, and Phato.

Jim Corbett National Park

About Sir Jim Corbett

Jim-Corbett-Indian-Writer

Edward James Corbett was born at Nainital in 1875, the eighth child of Christopher and Mary Jane Corbett. His father was the postmaster of Nainital. He did his matriculation at Nainital’s Philanders Smith College where he was admired by his masters for his modesty and retiring nature. He did not pursue his academics any further. He spent his summers at Gurnee House in Nainital while in winters he went down to Kaladhungi in the Tarai jungles. It was here he was taught how to fire a gun by his eldest brother, too. Their bungalow in Kaladhungi was inside a dense forest in which a large variety of plants and animals found refuge. The abundance of wildlife in Nainital those days can be gauged from the fact that Jim spotted tigers and leopards within a six-and-a-half-kilometer radius of the temple of the goddess Naini. As a result of living in such exotic and beautiful surroundings, he developed a spontaneous affinity with nature.

At the tender age of ten he found himself addicted to hunting, he had shot his first leopard and would just pick up and train his gun on any wild animal he encountered in the Jungle. When he was eighteen he joined the railways at Mokama Ghat in Bihar working as a fuel inspector and assistant station master. He then became a labor contractor. When World War I broke out in 1914, he took a batch of five hundred Kumaon labourers to France. He was good at recruiting and organizing labour and was able to make them work for him willingly. He also helped the British government by training allied soldiers in jungle warfare, he then held the rank of lieutenant colonel. In 1920 after his health broke down he resigned from the job and returned to Nainital and for the next twenty-four years, he served as an elected member of the Nainital municipal Board.

About Sir Jim Corbett

Jim-Corbett-Indian-Writer

Edward James Corbett was born at Nainital in 1875, the eighth child of Christopher and Mary Jane Corbett. His father was the postmaster of Nainital. He did his matriculation at Nainital’s Philanders Smith College where he was admired by his masters for his modesty and retiring nature. He did not pursue his academics any further.

He spent his summers at Gurnee House in Nainital while in winters he went down to Kaladhungi in the Tarai jungles. It was here he was taught how to fire a gun by his eldest brother, too. Their bungalow in Kaladhungi was inside a dense forest in which a large variety of plants and animals found refuge. The abundance of wildlife in Nainital those days can be gauged from the fact that Jim spotted tigers and leopards within a six-and-a-half-kilometer radius of the temple of the goddess Naini. As a result of living in such exotic and beautiful surroundings, he developed a spontaneous affinity with nature.

At the tender age of ten he found himself addicted to hunting, he had shot his first leopard and would just pick up and train his gun on any wild animal he encountered in the Jungle. When he was eighteen he joined the railways at Mokama Ghat in Bihar working as a fuel inspector and assistant station master. He then became a labor contractor.

When World War I broke out in 1914, he took a batch of five hundred Kumaon labourers to France. He was good at recruiting and organizing labour and was able to make them work for him willingly. He also helped the British government by training allied soldiers in jungle warfare, he then held the rank of lieutenant colonel. In 1920 after his health broke down he resigned from the job and returned to Nainital and for the next twenty-four years, he served as an elected member of the Nainital municipal Board.

While serving in the railways at Mokama Ghat, he would spend his holidays at Kaladhungi. Shikar, of course, would claim most of his time, He had bagged two man-eaters, a feat which made his name a household name in the far-flung areas and long before he was known as a skilled jungle man leading Shikar parties for the dignitaries. It was during one such Shikar party with three army officers the turning point came in the life of Jim – One Shikar party somewhere in northern India they came upon a lake with thousands of waterfowl. They were delighted to see the sight and shots ringing and echoing in the entire valley. In a matter of minutes, their count stood at three hundred waterfowls. Jim could not stomach this sacrilege. From that day he developed an aversion to this type of Shikar. And while his friends were overjoyed Jim vowed never to kill a beast without a reason. After he had killed a man-eater known as the Kuara of Pawalgadh in the mid-thirties he gave up Shikar as a sport. Thereafter he shot only those tigers which had turned man-eaters or cattle lifters.

Jim considered it his duty to kill such dangerous animals, a duty he carried out faithfully till his last days. E killed his last man-eater when he was well past sixty In those days the terror of Man-eaters loomed heavy on the regions of Kumaon and Garhwal and Jim was the only man who had the guts to take on and kill such bloodthirsty beasts, endowed as he was with his superlative skills required for the job he killed man-eaters in their den, in open grassland, in dense forest and on rocky slopes. Some of his most famous encounters are published in his six books of which the man-eaters of Kumaon and The Man-Eating Leopard of Rudraprayag are well renowned.

After World War II he settled in Kenya with his sister Maggie. It was there that at the ripe age of eighty he passed away leaving behind a legacy which still reverberates in the valleys of Kumaon and Garhwal.

In all his years serving the cause of wildlife preservation and later delivering of peace and tranquillity in the man-eater-infested regions of Kumaon and Garhwal Jim became inherent with wildlife conservation and the Indian Government in 1956 renamed the park – Jim Corbett National Park in honour of Jim Corbett the powerful missionary for wildlife preservation in India. A fitting tribute to the White Saint.

While serving in the railways at Mokama Ghat, he would spend his holidays at Kaladhungi. Shikar, of course, would claim most of his time, He had bagged two man-eaters, a feat which made his name a household name in the far-flung areas and long before he was known as a skilled jungle man leading Shikar parties for the dignitaries. It was during one such Shikar party with three army officers the turning point came in the life of Jim – One Shikar party somewhere in northern India they came upon a lake with thousands of waterfowl. They were delighted to see the sight and shots ringing and echoing in the entire valley. In a matter of minutes, their count stood at three hundred waterfowls. Jim could not stomach this sacrilege. From that day he developed an aversion to this type of Shikar. And while his friends were overjoyed Jim vowed never to kill a beast without a reason. After he had killed a man-eater known as the Kuara of Pawalgadh in the mid-thirties he gave up Shikar as a sport. Thereafter he shot only those tigers which had turned man-eaters or cattle lifters.

Jim considered it his duty to kill such dangerous animals, a duty he carried out faithfully till his last days. E killed his last man-eater when he was well past sixty In those days the terror of Man-eaters loomed heavy on the regions of Kumaon and Garhwal and Jim was the only man who had the guts to take on and kill such bloodthirsty beasts, endowed as he was with his superlative skills required for the job he killed man-eaters in their den, in open grassland, in dense forest and on rocky slopes. Some of his most famous encounters are published in his six books of which the man-eaters of Kumaon and The Man-Eating Leopard of Rudraprayag are well renowned.

After World War II he settled in Kenya with his sister Maggie. It was there that at the ripe age of eighty he passed away leaving behind a legacy which still reverberates in the valleys of Kumaon and Garhwal.

In all his years serving the cause of wildlife preservation and later delivering of peace and tranquillity in the man-eater-infested regions of Kumaon and Garhwal Jim became inherent with wildlife conservation and the Indian Government in 1956 renamed the park – Jim Corbett National Park in honour of Jim Corbett the powerful missionary for wildlife preservation in India. A fitting tribute to the White Saint.

Jim Corbett National Park is one of thirteen protected areas covered by the World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF) under their Terai Arc Landscape Program. The program’s goal is to protect three of the five terrestrial flagship species – the tiger, the Asian elephant, and the great one-horned rhinoceros – by restoring corridors of forest to link 13 protected areas of Nepal and India, and enable wildlife migration.

Corbett Wildlife

Corbett Attractions

A Jeep Safari into the local dense forest to see the wild animals in their natural habitat is an experience you won’t want to miss. And if you’re lucky, you might even have the chance to see a tiger. While on the safari, enjoy the lush views of the green forest, with a few streams and rivers running through it, and maybe even catch a glimpse of a waterfall or two. Accommodations are also available inside the park for those who want to stay overnight – talk about a once-in-a-lifetime experience!

If you’re planning a trip to see the wildlife at Corbett Tiger Reserve, you may be wondering what other attractions are nearby. There are actually quite a few other places to see and things to do in the area, so if you’re staying for more than a few days, you won’t get bored. To help you plan your trip, we’ve sorted out the details of some of the most popular hill stations near Corbett Tiger Reserve.

Best Places Around Corbett

Corbett Travel Information

Ramnagar is a small city near Jim Corbett National Park. The park can be easily accessed by road and rail networks from all the major cities of India, such as Delhi, Nainital, Moradabad, and Bareilly. You can reach the National Park in only half an hour, as it is situated at a distance of 15 km from Ramnagar railway station.

Book In Jim Corbett National Park

The Corbett Tiger Reserve is a perfect habitat for a variety of majestic animals, including the Royal Bengal Tiger, Asiatic Elephant, Reptiles, Birds, and many other wild animals. The Reserve’s diverse wildlife and stunning landscapes have captured the imagination of many people. The area’s natural uniqueness was recognized long ago, and in 1936 the Jim Corbett National Park became the first National Park to be established in mainland Asia.

Top Hotels In Jim Corbett

Green Retreat Resort Jim Corbett

For travelers looking for a good hotel in Jim Corbett (Ramnagar), Green Retreat Resort is a reasonable choice. It is very popular among tourists, with a smooth check-in/check-out process, flexible policies, and friendly management that garner great customer satisfaction. The Hotel has a standard Check-In time of 01:00 PM and a Check-Out time of 10:00 AM. You can find numerous hotels in Jim Corbett (Ramnagar) under different categories, but Green Retreat Resort is one of the best in its category.

 Gebua Khan, Kunwarpur, Nainital, Uttarakhand, 263139

5/5

Hotel Limewood Nainital

Nestled in the stunning natural surroundings of Nainital, Hotel Limewood is the perfect place to relax and recharge. Our hotel offers customized cuisine and personalized services to make your stay truly special. Our convenient location in Armadale Compound, Jahangirabad Palace, Mallital, Nainital is just a short walk from Mall Road, making it easy to explore all that this beautiful city has to offer. Hotel Limewood is one of the finest hotels in Nainital, and we are proud to offer outstanding hospitality and service excellence.

High Ct Rd, Mallital, Nainital, Uttarakhand 263002

4/5

La Perle River Resort

La Perle River Resorts is a beautiful resort located on the bank of River kosi. It has been launched in the year 2004 with the name “La Perle”. The resort has been spread over 4.5 acre of land with 19 luxury rooms. The gardens are well maintained in the middle of Mango Orchards with a perfect combination of wilderness & nature. La Perle is among the best jungle theme property with all the luxurious facilities you need to unwind and relax. The nearest city is Ramnagar which is just 6 kms away.

Dhikuli, Ramnagar Distt. Nainital Uttarakhand 244715

4.5/5
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